t33j:

"7.9 of out 10"

t33j:

"7.9 of out 10"

pluckychicken:

crick3tknight:

lakidaa:

bi-polar-oid:

dinners ready

( ._.)./ an explanation: 
The dog has an issue where his esophagus doesn’t work right; it doesn’t get food in there right because it’s all stretched out and stuff. So what dog owners (and cat owners and I guarantee you the cat ones look goofier) do is make a highchair and feed them upright so gravity can be a hero. It’s also really cute. 
The disorder is called Megaesophagus. 

Here is a cat with the same disorder in his eatin’ sock. 

EATIN’ SOCK

ALWAYS REBLOG THE EATIN’ SOCK

pluckychicken:

crick3tknight:

lakidaa:

bi-polar-oid:

dinners ready

( ._.)./ an explanation: 

The dog has an issue where his esophagus doesn’t work right; it doesn’t get food in there right because it’s all stretched out and stuff. So what dog owners (and cat owners and I guarantee you the cat ones look goofier) do is make a highchair and feed them upright so gravity can be a hero. It’s also really cute. 

The disorder is called Megaesophagus. 

Cat with Megaesophagus

Here is a cat with the same disorder in his eatin’ sock. 

EATIN’ SOCK

ALWAYS REBLOG THE EATIN’ SOCK

(Source: bi-polar-oid, via fireandnoise)

importantbirds:

This… THE mosp DANGER army… please watch out the Trouble Makers and their Drummig Frien

importantbirds:

This… THE mosp DANGER army… please watch out the Trouble Makers and their Drummig Frien

(Source: robertdafoto.com.br, via prisonforjerks)

archiemcphee:

If any of you are ophidiophobic the Department of Awesome Camouflage would like to offer reassurance that, no matter what your eyes or adrenal cortex are trying to tell you, the animals in these photo are NOT snakes. They’re a wily species of caterpillar that wards off predators by expanding and turning the end of its body, which bears the unmistakable markings of a snake’s head on the underside. If approached, they’ll even go so far as to strike like a real snake. These strikes are completely harmless, but they look so convincing that we’re pretty sure we’d flinch all the same.

This fascinating photo was taken by Daniel Janzen, a biology professor at the University of Pennsylvania, in the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste in northwestern Costa Rica. He’s working there cataloguing caterpillars and says this specimen is a member of the genus Hemeroplanes

[via Telegraph.co.uk and Geekologie]

Natural selection really can be amazing.

(via tomewing)

griseus:

Ocean sunfish (Mola mola) at Caupolican shipwreck, Valparaiso, Chile

(via deepsea)

Mantises do jazz hands. 
(via)

Mantises do jazz hands. 

(via)

(via lexlotl)